Mississippi Litigation Review & Commentary

Mississippi Litigation Review & Commentary

Comments on the Latest Developments in Mississippi Civil Litigation

Philip is a trial attorney based in Jackson, Mississippi with a diverse civil litigation practice.

Category Archives: Book Reviews

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My Favorite Books of 2016

Posted in Book Reviews
Pretty slow on the legal front, so I’m going to do something new and list my favorite books that I read this year. A caveat is that I view books as like ice cream–everyone’s taste is a little different. My favorites probably will not be your favorites. But most of us can agree on what… Continue Reading

Book Review: You Can’t Teach Vision, by John Morgan

Posted in Book Reviews
You Can’t Teach Vision is John Morgan’s follow up to You Can’t Teach Hungry, which I favorably reviewed here. The sub-title of the book is the Twenty-First Century Law Firm, which Morgan continues to build. It could have been titled ‘what I’ve learned from thirty years in the law business.” The book contains twenty-four short… Continue Reading

Book Review: Justice for Ella, by Pam Johnson

Posted in Book Reviews
Pam Johnson’s Justice for Ella is a story about a courageous battle against white supremacy in 1959 Mississippi. It’s an irresistible feel good story that would make an entertaining movie. The book’s leading characters are Ella Gaston and Jewell McMahan of Hattiesburg. Ella is black. Jewell is white. While visiting family in Noxubee County, Ella… Continue Reading

Book Review: Assuming the Risk, by Michael Orey

Posted in Book Reviews
Assuming the Risk is legal journalist Michael Orey’s 1999 book about “the mavericks, the lawyers, and the whistle-blowers who beat big tobacco.” Unwittingly, the book is a prequel to Kings of Tort and The Fall of the House of Zeus.  The subject of the book is tobacco litigation in Mississippi in the 1980’s and 1990’s.… Continue Reading

Book Review: The Education of a Lifetime, by Robert Khayat

Posted in Book Reviews
Note: the following was originally published in the Capital Area Bar Association Newsletter.  The Education of a Lifetime is former University of Mississippi Chancellor Robert Khayat’s memoir. Sprinkled with wisdom and humor, the book is an enjoyable read. Divided into seventy-five short chapters, the book covers Khayat’s childhood in Moss Point, playing football for Ole… Continue Reading

Litigator Reviews Grisham’s The Litigators

Posted in Book Reviews
Maxwell Kennerly, who writes the excellent Litigation & Trial Blog, recently reviewed John Grisham’s The Litigators. Kennerly nails why I enjoy Grisham’s novels: Surprisingly, I liked it, for the same reason I thought Boston Legal was the best of the TV lawyer dramas: Grisham doesn’t try for pure realism and fail, instead he satirizes mass torts (and injury… Continue Reading

Book Review: Fixing the Engine of Justice, Diagnosis and Repair of Our Jury System, by David Tunno

Posted in Book Reviews, Improving the Jury System
Unreliable, inefficient or inoperative altogether. Those are words that longtime trial consultant David Tunno uses to describe the jury system in the United States. Tunno’s book Fixing the Engine of Justice, Diagnosis and Repair of Our Jury System gives his take on the problems and solutions for the jury system. According to Tunno, the major… Continue Reading

Book Review: Point Made, by Ross Guberman

Posted in Book Reviews
Want to improve your legal writing? If so, you may want to consider reading: Point Made, How to Write Like the Nation’s Top Advocates, by Ross Guberman. The book’s product description on Amazon states in part: With Point Made, legal writing expert Ross Guberman throws a life preserver to attorneys, who are under more pressure… Continue Reading

Book Review: You Can’t Teach Hungry- Creating the Multimillion Dollar Law Firm, by John Morgan

Posted in Book Reviews
You Can’t Teach Hungry is John Morgan’s self-described how-to guide for building the multi-million dollar law firm. Morgan is the founder of the Morgan & Morgan personal injury law firm that has developed a national footprint. The firm lists eleven lawyers in its Jackson office, which makes it one of the largest plaintiff firms in the state.… Continue Reading

Book Review: Cross-Examination Handbook, by Ronald H. Clark, George R. Dekle, Sr., and William S. Bailey

Posted in Book Reviews
The newest book devoted exclusively to cross-examination is Cross-Examination Handbook: Persuasion, Strategies & Techniques. Here is the book’s website and here is its Amazon page. Here is the cover and a list of the book’s chapters:   1. Introduction to Book, CD, & Website 2. Purposes of Cross & the Total Trial Approach 3. The… Continue Reading

Book Review: Unbillable Hours, by Ian Graham

Posted in Book Reviews
I recently read Unbillable Hours, by Ian Graham. The book is a memoir by a former associate at mega-firm Latham Watkins’ L.A. office. Here is the book’s description: The story—part memoir, part hard-hitting expose—of a first-year law associate negotiating the arduous path through a system designed to break those who enter it before it makes… Continue Reading

Book Review: Typography for Lawyers, by Matthew Butterick

Posted in Book Reviews
I recently finished reading Typography for Lawyers by Matthew Butterick. The book’s byline describes it as “essential tools for polished & persuasive documents. I agree. // // What is typography? Basically typography is how a document looks. Lawyers and judges think about typography all the time. Ever said: “this brief looks like crap”? If so,… Continue Reading

Book Review: Rick Friedman on Becoming a Trial Lawyer

Posted in Book Reviews
Rick Friedman On Becoming a Trial Lawyer is a book that every civil plaintiff lawyer and criminal defense lawyer should read. The cover flap provides a good description of the book:  Combining nuts-and-bolts practical advice with inspirational insights, he guides us on the journey every trial lawyer must take, from the struggle to gain trial experience to the search for… Continue Reading

Book Review: The Price of Defiance- James Meredith and the Integration of Ole Miss, by Charles W. Eagles

Posted in Book Reviews
I heard about Charles W. Eagles book The Price of Defiance–  James Meredith and the Integration of Ole Miss after it was the subject of a panel discussion at the 2010 Mississippi Bar Convention. I’m glad that I did. Here is the description of the book from the inside flap of the cover: When James Meredith enrolled as… Continue Reading

Book Review: Your Witness, Lessons on Cross-Examination and Life from Great Chicago Trial Lawyers, edited by Steven F. Molo and James R. Figliulo

Posted in Book Reviews
A while back I tried to read Your Witness, Lessons on Cross-Examination and Life from Great Chicago Trial Lawyers, edited by Steven F. Molo and James R. Figliulo. The book is devoted to cross-examination techniques.  The average customer review on Amazon is 4 and half stars, which is higher than the average review for The Art of Cross Examination.  The… Continue Reading

Book Review: Litigation Logic- A Practical Guide to Effective Argument, by Paul Bosanac

Posted in Book Reviews
Litigation Logic– A Practical Guide to Effective Argument is an interesting book. As stated in the introduction: This book is dedicated to presenting informal fallacies through legal arguments… The product description on Amazon is: Learning to use, and defend against, informal fallacies are the keys to effective argument. This one-of-a-kind book examines informal fallacies and features… Continue Reading

Book Review: Trial and Error- The Education of a Courtroom Lawyer, by John C. Tucker

Posted in Book Reviews
John Tucker is a former partner with the prominent Chicago based law firm Jenner and Block. Before retiring to concentrate on writing, Tucker had an outstanding career as a litigator than included arguing two cases before the U.S. Supreme Court and serving as trial counsel in several high-profile cases. Tucker’s trials included defending the “Chicago Eight”,… Continue Reading

Book Review: Lawyers’ Poker, 52 Lessons that Lawyers Can Learn From Poker Players, by Steven Lubet

Posted in Book Reviews
Some would argue that understanding game theory and other principals that apply in poker can help the way that a litigator thinks about a case. For instance, poker players apply mathematical formulas to poker hands that can be useful in analyzing the settlement value of a case. Both playing poker and litigating a case are deceptively simple, but often extremely complex.… Continue Reading