As the ABA Journal reports of new scams hitting Texas law firms, I continue to receive emails that look like scams.

Without exception, the scam emails are generic, like this email received today:

Dear Counselor
My Company is currently in need of a commercial litigation lawyer, there is an urgent matter. If you can help with our legal need kindly get back to me immediately for more details.
Mr. Eric Bahir
Sales Manager
Tatworth Electronics
29 Pine Drive
Great Neck NY 11021
Tel 516 589 5281
Fax 516-706-2571
Toll Free 1-800-951-6484
ericbahir@aol.com
ericba@tatworth.com
www.tatworth.com

That’s how every company I’ve ever represented gets its lawyers. Generic spam emails.

 

Imagine our happiness when I was at Baker Donelson and we received an email from Ford Motor Company to defend it in products cases: "Dear Counselor, our company is currently in need of a products litigation lawyer. Kindly get back to me immediately for more details." 

 

Isn’t this how you’ve gotten all your corporate clients? 

 

If you’re going to go to the trouble to find my email address and send me an email, why not write “Dear Phil” or “Mr. Thomas” or something personalized? They never do.

 

If you’re going to claim to be in New York, why not write the email like English is your native language? “Kindly get back to me”? If this guy is really from New York he would say something like: “give me a call, jackass.”

 

Or why not have my email address in the “to” line? In the “to” line of this email was the email address for a lawyer at a large Mississippi law firm. A lawyer who does not identify commercial litigation as his practice area.

 

Of course, this guy did go to the trouble of setting up a website for the bogus looking company Tatworth Electronics. Google “Tatworth Electronics” and see how many results you get for this “international” company. I got four hits. All directed at Tatworth’s website. By comparison, the local restaurant Soulshine Pizza generates over 30 pages of search results on Google.

 

The scary thing is that people must still be falling for these scams. Otherwise, they would not still be trying it. 

 

For prior posts on lawyer email scams, see here and here.