The Wall Street Journal reported last week on the latest investment returns for public pensions like Mississippi’s PERS. It has a good explanation of why governments aren’t doing anything about the growing PERS crisis:

But government officials seeking to make their investment targets more conservative have a powerful disincentive: Assumptions of high returns appeal to

Not really.

Here is a Charlie Mitchell column in the Clarion-Ledger about PERS. It includes:

While PERS is far more solvent than Social Security, Uncle Sam’s program for senior citizens, there are some question marks.

Bad analogy. Uncle Sam can print money to pay Social Security benefits. Literally. Mississippi can’t print money. You can’t compare

In Saturday’s WSJ, Jason Zweig discussed the unrealistic investment assumptions in the nation’s public pensions, which includes Mississippi’s PERS.  The opening:

With U.S. stocks at all-time highs, it’s more important than ever that investors be brutally realistic about future returns.

Some of the most purportedly sophisticated investors in the world, the managers of giant pension